Skip to main content

About your Search

20130801
20130831
SPONSOR
STATION
CSPAN2 150
LANGUAGE
English 150
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 150
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2013 7:30pm EDT
written a groundbreaking book called "the brotherhood: america's next great enemy." i think this is the number one sold on amazon.com and it is riveting to show how does organization has managed to infiltrate into various capitals throughout the western world and it has managed to come under the obama administration, metastasize and so without any further ado i would like to introduce you to a wonderful individual, erick stackelbeck. [applause] >> i want to thank you for hosting this event. i look at sera as a modern-day esther or deborah. such a time as this. thank you for having me here. if you write a book, you spend a year with that and say this book can put me through pack. but i think that people are reading it. it gets into detail about the main player in the arab spring, which i refers to as the islamist winter in the butt. the muslim brotherhood is done, out of power in egypt, we don't have to worry about them. this is the postmortem of history. it has been has the muslim brotherhood, the leaders were killed and imprisoned in the group was banned for decades. the headquarters w
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2013 2:45pm EDT
america still is the best hope for the human race. >> yes. i think that is still true, though since i published that book, other countries have been catching up on the united states in terms of economic output, particularly communist china, and in my opinion, america will remain the top nation for the indefinite future, and the reason i say that is because of the united states is a very free country. in many wayings, the freest country in the world, and freedom means that you can interchange ideas and develop ideas and create ideas and it's ideas in the long run that keep one nation ahead of another. the ability to produce striking new ideas. i think the united states still has that capacity, and therefore, will survive as the world's top nation. >> host: well, recently, two books you published on darwin and socrates. how did darwin become charles darwin? >> guest: well, he was a man who could be his own master were the simple reason he inherited a lot of money. he came from a distinguished family of doctors and other people. his father was a very successful doctor, so he never had
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2013 12:00pm EDT
neoliberal economic policies by people from the global south like africa, central and latin america and a majority of asia and discusses the possibilities for an alternative system to emerge. this is about two hours. >> okay. thank you, max. thanks to the brecht forum for hosting us, thanks to all of you for coming out. i am andy, i'm an editor at verso books, and we are the proud publishers of vijay's new book, "poorer nations." i'm going to just briefly introduce vijay. he's going to talk about his book for a bit, then we're going to have a q&a. i'll kick it off with a few questions, then we're going to turn it over to you. and as max said, we have to -- we're hoping to, you know, wait for the mic to get to you, and this is going to be recorded, it'll play on booktv on c-span at some point in the future, which is exciting. i get the feeling that a lot of people here know vijay, but just for those who don't, a little bit of bio about vijay prashad. vijay is the edward saed chair, very appropriate, at the american university of beirut right now. he was formerly and for a long time t
CSPAN
Aug 11, 2013 12:30am EDT
states. ali muhamed who had sworn to love this as an immigrant and army sergeant enlistee to america looks at him and says i love bin laden. i don't need a wad to attack america. i've ex-met number of sleepers that i kid activate. as matthew and he walks out of the restaurant. he said that's the most dangerous man i've ever met and we cannot leave him on the street and yet they left him on the street for x. max number of months. the bombs go off in africa 200 some dead in and they wait a month. they finally arrest him and when they go to rest and guess what they do click they get them in a motel room in new york and they let him go to the bathroom. police 101. for anyone who has ever worked csi miami or dragnet noses as soon as you put the cuffs on somebody you search them or whatever. before they put the cuffs on them they let him go to the bathroom and he later admitted that he flushed key and permission down the toilet including alza were he's location the number two guy in al qaeda and guess what happened to ali muhamed? he is a john doe warrant for weeks and months because they
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2013 3:00pm EDT
oakland. her story is an example of what made america great. courage to confront hard shot and abuse, determination to move past and gratitude to a country that made it possible for anyone to succeed and discover one's self worth. .. >> she has also written articles for the "wall street journal," national tribune, los angeles times, "the weekly standard," and others. currently, ms. ma is a vice president of the advisory firm, and she's the policy adviser of the heartland institute, a free market think tank. it is my pleasure to introduce ying ma. [applause] >> thank you, all, thank you so much. rita, thank you very much for the kind introduction. i want to say thanks to all the volunteers who made this event happen, special thanks to rita for all her hard work, coordination in recent months, and, howard, thank you for having me here. it's an honor for me to tell you a bit about my book and my story, but whenever i talk about my book, i have a tendency to think of another author, and that author is president barack obama. as you may recall, the liberal media raved about barack obama's
CSPAN
Aug 4, 2013 10:00pm EDT
pact all these people were interested of the south asian political dynamic in america. that was my first event at the forum. and those it is right feel most at home here in new york in drew is modest because these books and we have done together starting over one decade ago when we will talk about why the meeting of the world social forum it was a world conference against racism and intolerance and discrimination so why was there such chaos come on the stage of the left? there never seems to be a coherent agenda. we have so many different issues in there and able to fight a united horizon. not a single horizon but some kind of unity but the first time we talk about this i said i would write a book about it be over 100 pages because of durbin was in danger of being forgotten. faugh five all that work that went to put together this major conference was in danger of the loss. i remember we matt and i said i cannot publish his book because it is a book of defeat it does not recognize there is no future for the movement. it is a swan song that never came together. said then went back wh
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2013 3:15pm EDT
. next, jonathan lyons recounts the introduction of the enlightenment to america and the role that benjamin franklin played in its development. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> thank you for those kind words. i'd forgotten about some of that stuff. [laughter] that's always good to hear a refresher course. it's really wonderful to be here in seattle. as i mentioned to some of you when i first arrived, my wife and i have only recently relocated to the pacific northwest. we're based out of portland, oregon, having left washington, d.c., the other washington. there is one institution i miss and i'll probably always miss, and that's the library of congress where i wrote this book and most of my three earlier books as well. but i know that quality of life and the quality of discourse, particularly civic discourse, will be greatly improved. [laughter] and i know, also, that benjamin franklin would be particularly pleased to know that i'm speaking here tonight, and he would commend this institution on its civic-mindedness. franklin was known as a projector, that is he loves soc
CSPAN
Aug 18, 2013 9:00am EDT
were over 130 hijackings in america. sometimes at a rate of more than one a week. sometimes two a day. i was looking for a story i could explore more deeply. i was looking for people who have been fugitives from years after hijacking planes. i was looking at the list of people who are still on the run, and it was pretty much an all-male crew. sunday i saw this one woman's name, cathy kerkow, a 21 year woman from small town in oregon. i was just intrigued. i thought what would make this 20 year old woman turned her back on everything she had ever known to hijack a plane to a foreign country and never be able to come home again? so that kind became a four-year obsession for me, a long journey to tell that story. i'm going to start by telling not about her story and the story of her accomplice, a more about the general history of hijacking in america. as she started in 1961 was the first hijacking in america, may 1, 1961. a cuban exile with out a statement on the miami to key west flight and told the pilot that he wanted to go to havana to warn the dell cast about an assassination attemp
CSPAN
Aug 18, 2013 7:00pm EDT
socialist leading liberal democracies in europe and more and more in america. i turn that soft liberalism. that is what we're going to focus on today. in order to understand the claims it will have to do a history of liberalism. wishing to fair worshiping the state is a history of liberalism as a blueprint for a bigger history that we need to sort out all of the confusions that we find. so i'm going to try to provide a clear understanding of what liberalism is in its essence. actress it back 500 years to machiavelli as the founder of modern liberalism. so we need to do a lot of history to understand. when we look at the roots of modern liberalism, what we find is said to a movement which the fis will liberalism really has been over the centuries in one form or another, simultaneously a rejection of christianity because it occurs within the christian context, and the simultaneous embrace of this world as the highest bid. of this material world as our ultimate and only home. now, liberals in america today are the intellectual heirs of this twofold desire or freedom. of course you on the lat
CSPAN
Aug 25, 2013 11:45pm EDT
bookexpo america publishers annual trade show in new york city. joining us now where is the well-known best-selling author who's written over 20 books, biographies on james monroe, patrick henry and his latest book called mr. president george washington and the making of the nation's highest office. what did you discover new about george washington and this biography? >> the constitution had executive power in a president of the united states, but it failed to disclose what those powers were to visit and it didn't even tell the president how to use them. it told them simply that he was to execute the office of the president. what does that mean? it means nothing today. it meant nothing then and that is what the framers wanted. they had lived for years under an absolute monarchies in indolent and under the tyranny of that malarkey and they were not about to recreate the rtc they created a figurehead in the first president of taking the oath of office was to be just that and george washington and penn the commander-in-chief of the revolutionary army army that defeated the world's most po
CSPAN
Aug 3, 2013 10:45am EDT
winning wait until the midnight hour, black america, and bright lights from barack obama. our third scheduled speaker is kendall thomas who is travelingy has not yet arrived but we are hoping he will take the stage as soon as he does come. i will introduce him in his absence right now. he is nash professor of law and co-founder and director of the center for the study of law and culture at columbia university and professor thomas is one of the editors of the seminole volume critical race theory, the form of the movement. the three powerful thinkers and visionary speakers. [applause] >> get settled, and make yourself comfortable and we are so glad you made it. i was saying to camille and sarah before we came on that in so many ways barack obama has set up our conversation about blacks in the twenty-first century through his comments yesterday but i want to put that in the larger context because we are trying to take the backward and forward look on this panel in our conversation. the backward look is about where have we come, where have we come to since in the 50 years since the marc
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2013 3:00pm EDT
powerful british emotion. i hope that the contents of north america is not paralyzed by embarrassment like we are. >> host: do you detail the experience in "unapologetic," what happened to you? >> i do, but it's not a straight, down the line, abc, linier book. the experiences are in there, but it's not the story of my life as a believer. it's an attempt to find a piece of string to run all through the experiences of guilt, forgiveness, questioning about the pain and how the world works, and leading on over here in a way which makes for one kind of believing life story, not every kind. there's lots of other places that people can and do begin, but in my experience the way to be universal is to be really, really specific. you start off with the human stuff, namely yourself, and you say do you recognize it? on the whole, people do, even if it's nothing like they experience, but they recognize the way it's in human terms, something about how it is close to the self-and the brain and heart and the soul of another human being, and people are quite curious about humans and willing to cross b
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2013 5:30pm EDT
shock most of your listeners, but the aggression of america. i don't even call it america anymore. it's not america. it's not the united states. it's just another country. we are undistinguished. we used to be special and different everybody knew it. now it's just another government running out of the geographical area. so it's turning in to a police state very rapidly, but the militarization of all the local police, they don't knock on the door anymore, they do swat team raids, the government is completely and totally bankrupt just last year. out of approximately $1.2 trillion. the numbers get out of control. 90% was purchased we the federal reserve. it even the chinese don't want to buy it anymore. they want to sell it. they are trying to get rid of their dollars. there will be a panic at some point. >> we invited you on booktv to talk about a book that just come out. "totally incorrect." by doug casey? who is lewis james? >> he writes a news letter called "international speculator" which junior resource stocks expa ration companies. the most volatile section of any stock market anywh
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2013 9:00pm EDT
is saying. do you see politics in america moving towards the david roeder changing of the guard philosophy class. .. >> it is affecting people's attitus as they enter the political process, and i believe at this point, the democrats believe that that will work to their advantage, but as i said, these things are organic, and just as bill clinton kind of rethought and redefined the democratic party after three consecutive losses during the reagan and first bush presidencies, there may be a republican on the horizon who will similarly do that and be able to capture the imagination of his or her party, and then win in the national election. it's what keeps people like me going. [laughter] [applause] >> thank you, all, very much. [applause] >> up next on booktv, arguing the american media aided in the re-election of president barack obama saying the media was consistently critical of the republican party and the nominee, mitt romney, while negligent to do the same with barack obama. this is about 45 minutes. [applause] >> thank you, john, and my thanks to the harming foundation for i
CSPAN
Aug 18, 2013 5:30pm EDT
question is, there is freedom for all religions in america, that is islam just a religion? well, we had to ask him who is the perfect muslim? it is obviously mohammed. muslims want to be like mohammed. mohammed goes through three stages. the first stage, mohammed is a religious leader in mecca and only makes 70 cumbersome 12 years and he gets chased out of town. and then mohammed goes to a jewish city 210 mouse to the north cold medina. they rejected his faith and so he goes into the minority neighborhood meetings to organize the following and he becomes a political leader. and then mohammed's followers get a little pushy, argumentative threatening to get chased out for disturbing the peace and mohammed allows his followers to rob the caravans headed back to mecca in retaliation for the mac is just an amount. there's two sets of verses in the koran. those revealed in mecca, which are more peaceful and religious and those revealed in medina, which are political and military and the later one supersede earlier ones. in 624 a.d., and i can send a thousand soldiers to protect their turf and th
CSPAN
Aug 18, 2013 1:00am EDT
going to start the story with che on his motorcycle trip in 1952 going around but america where he discovers horrific poverty and changes his course from being a doctor to a revolutionary. we weren't going to take you into the mountains where he is fighting alongside castro to overthrow -- what we wanted to do was drop you in bolivia in 1967 show you what bolivia was like, what the united states policy was like, why we feared che so much about ridiculous point and kevin you can fill us in from here. [applause] one thing before kevin starts, any time anybody has a question please feel free to interrupt us. don't wait until the end. just pepper us with questions. >> we initially started this narrative we were going to look at che is a point of view character. we thought he might be an interesting way. we were picking out people to drive the story and we thought che that has to be one and that was a struggle because there's so much written. the che reading list i had about him was 12 or 15 books. the books that we had on the green berets and intelligence guys was two or three. and ess
CSPAN
Aug 11, 2013 11:15pm EDT
with the institute with a special-interest in america's cultural war. she writes on family, feminism, homosexuality, affirmative action and campus political correctness. she helped publish a book entitled radical and chief which was exposing obama's lost years that nobody knows anything about. his new book is spreading the wealth. welcome mr. kurtz. [applause] thanks so much. it's great to be here. this is the second time i've had the privilege of addressing this group and i want to thank phyllis schlafly again for having me here. i always enjoy the defense. my topic today is obama's policy towards the suburbs. it's a remarkable issue and it doesn't get covered by the media. it's something people should know about. i'm going to get to that in the second but i cannot resist because i have an audience of college kids taking two or three minutes at the beginning to let you know of another focus of my work. let me see a show of p.m. both hands. how many of you have heard the campus movement? you are probably going to hear about it next year if you haven't heard about it already. this is
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2013 7:00pm EDT
current political situation in america? >> i think the current political situation in america is very interesting. it's ripe for a libertarian-leaning person or group of people to really show them how you do 2 when you lift government and people's lives can be better. now we're seeing in political so many ways government can actually be not only a destructive force but a terrifying force. if you stop and think about it, when conspiracy they are resists start sounding rash tell me, you know the government is in trouble. >> you have another chapter in here "rudie can fail ." what is the chapter about? >> the chapter is about mayor giuliani in his own tenure in new york city in 1994 really trying to bring the video music awards to new york city. the last few years they had been in los angeles. i actually attended the last three where mtv was going to build the headquarter. they were going take it out of times square. the mayor said we'll rule -- roll out the red carpet. the mtv took on the change. they said we're going let some of the djs really be a part of the show. we're going let you
CSPAN
Aug 4, 2013 7:00pm EDT
: obama versus rom and the future of elections in america," dan balz gives an inside look at the presidential campaigns of mitt romney and barack obama. brenda wineapple chronicles the social, political and cultural history of the u.s. leading up to the civil war and the reconstruction period that followed in "ecstatic nation." in "manson: the life and times of charles manson," jeff quinn chronicles the life of charles manson. "pink be sari revolution. " in "hothouse," the survival of art at america's most celebrated publishing house. robert wilson, editor of "the american scholar," recounts the life and career of civil war era photographer matthew brady in matthew brady: portraits of a nation. look for these titles in bookstores this coming year and watch for the authors in the near future on booktv and on booktv.org. >> booktv is on location at bookexpo america which is the annual publishers' trade show held in new york city. and we're talking with the publisher of chicago review press about some of their upcoming titles. cynthia sherry, what do you have coming out this year? >
CSPAN
Aug 11, 2013 2:00pm EDT
of nature, butterflies. and the bison entreat me because it was the largest land animal in america, and it was brought to the edge of extinction by our foolishness. i wanted to see if i could help bring it back. when i started 30 years ago, started collecting and breeding bison there were 3,000 bison in north america which is all that there were in the world. now there are 500,000, ten times as many more. and of those 500,000 now 55,000, on our ranges, so we have 10 percent of all the bison in the world into an percent of all of the prairie dust. [laughter] >> as beautiful as they are coming anyone who has the sliders, tell us about your relationship. for a long time. tell us how that started and then the life span and have a book about. >> the book took seven years to write. our conversation goes back more than 20. i was on an assignment for a new york magazine. ted had recently arrived in montana, cowboy country. he booted all of the cattle off and raised this turn of those people on a.m. radio. [laughter] and that other network we won't mention tonight. i arrived out there. ted
CSPAN
Aug 3, 2013 11:00pm EDT
'70s between the 1968 and 72 there were over 30 hijackings and america. sometimes at the rate of more than one per week or even two per day. i was looking for people that had been fugitives for many years after hijacking planes. looking at the list of those who led another run there is pretty much of male crew then they saw a woman's name cathy kerkow from the -- from a small town in oregon i was intrigued and it thought would make this 20 old woman turned her back on everything she had ever known to hijack a plane to a foreign country to never come home again? so that was a four year obsession for me in the long journey of the story. i will start telling the story of her accomplice but more about the general history of hijacking in america and when they started a cuban exile whipped out a steak knife on the miami to key west fly into the private if you want to go to havana there is the assassination attempt orchestrated by the dominican republic than there were others and started the epidemic with an outbreak and cluster the hijackings then they fall off and were back with more
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2013 11:00pm EDT
defense corps of america that w. dcaa was another one. they had 54 chapters across the country that included motorcycle and helper units. they were military trained and they knew jujitsu. they are known as the glory gals and they -- their motto was the hell we can't. the red cross offered opportunities for civilians to volunteer for the war effort. the group organized blood drives and trained nurse aides and grande clubs where members of the armed forces could relax and socialize both in the united states and oversees. african-american women served oversees with the red cross around the globe. helen dickson kaine caused a sensation when she reported for duty along the al kam highway in march 1943. hazel was an assistant director of the red cross club assistant eco-'s women were not directors. only men could be directors. she worked by the dawson creek british columbia. she was the only woman at the club and served the 95th engineers, the group of engineers who built the highway across canada and alaska. when she arrived she was greeted by 1300 black soldiers. they hadn't seen many w
CSPAN
Aug 18, 2013 10:00pm EDT
things for stanching the flow of illegal drugs from south america into the united states. for now, as chief of naval operations, admiral greeter at told congress and this is a quote, we will not be able to respond in the way the nation has expected independent on us. in short, that is the end of his''. and in short the baby will have sequestration by operating less while extending the deployment of ships at sea which ironically increases the cost of repairing them and also buying fewer ships in the future. it will reduce our fleet over the short term as it diminishes the seapower stability to recover the presence in the future. there is no good news here. history offers sober prove. the state -- the state can achieve great power by taking best proximity and then lost the dominant seapower. to ignore pericles' advice to get the advantage of this seapower and lost both the peloponnesus anwr and a great power status. in this sort -- search for resources on land to build a powerful fleet it then became tangled of the italian city states and ignore the transformation of naval architecture
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2013 8:00am EDT
coverage. he has the single most track record of any governor in america today. two plus two with a challenge from this man we all know about that rock and would be making it 82. when his parents were on vacation the one that the painted over because they found it offensive. a little bit of racism going on there. they don't like him and she's given an interview to a network to say it's. there is a stop the press story for you. rick santorum. ladies and gentlemen did we know who karen santorum was beating before she ever met rick -- dating before she ever met racket and more importantly did the children need to hear these stories? did have any bearing on the presidential race other than to smear rick and karen santorum? mitt goes a long do this is a delicious apples to apples comparison. mitt has a 5,400 word essay for devoted to him in the washington post. in that essay we learn stop the press seeing 15 he cut some boys here and we learned at the same data barack obama switched his position on the rights and the boy allegedly was a homosexual. the story isn't switching his position.
CSPAN
Aug 18, 2013 8:45am EDT
. topping the list this week. >> next, an interview with ishmael beah from book of america on his book on the radiance of tomorrow. this is about 15 minutes. >> on your screen is ishmael beah, author of a long way gone. the second book is coming out, mr. beah. why did you choose to make it a novel? >> first of all, i wanted to depart from the memoirs and nonfiction. second, the issues i read about in the new book, "radiance of tomorrow," it's about a lot of people. experiences going home after war another people six euros, so it is composite of the tanks. i want to have the freedom to play around with words and images. >> what kind of freedom is writing a novel gave you rather than nonfiction? >> with the novel, for me particularly there's room to play with language more than to actually maybe extend the recurrence is. you know, expand them more and traumatize them a little more. they were also in the same time. the runaway coming to us whatever they wanted they wanted to do was this novel i talk about things that existed before the war. after work, and the existed again. so i try
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2013 10:15am EDT
of habeas corpus in america talked about the protection of civil liberties in the u.s. since 9/11. it's about an hour and 40 minutes. good morning everybody. welcome. it is a tremendous honor to share the stage with bob and anthony who are two of my favorite people and i admire their work enormously. this is a huge topic we have to cover tonight. there are a lot of aspect and it's going to be a challenge to be able to cover some of those. i have warned both bob and anthony that i will be holding them to tight schedules so we can get through it and we will have plenty of time for your questions and we want to have a good discussion following. in your association goes back many years and it's been fruitful starting with the production of this book crisis and the episodes in the growth of american government pity it was first published by oxford university press in 1987 and remained in print ever since. we were very honored to be able to issue the 21st anniversary edition last year and your work has certainly informed a lot of the independence of the program not least of which was yo
CSPAN
Aug 25, 2013 6:00pm EDT
bankrupting america. he talks about long-term deficit reduction. >> it's about what is getting ready to happen to the country. why it is getting ready to happen and what the possible solutions to get out of them are here is a great example of how we got in trouble in the first place because what our founders believe is we were able to have a central limited government and i believe that we should have a limited central government but it could be authoritative in the areas that we give it responsibility. but beyond that, what to do is totally devonish all the laboratories of experimentation and these regional differences when you take it and pull the power away and said it in washington what you are doing is markedly diminishing the liberty and freedoms of people on outside of washington. is the money tempting? >> guest: not for me. when i ran for the senate one of my campaign teams synnott bringing anything home to oklahoma. and the reason is there is no money here. out of the $3.6 trillion last year. we borrowed from the people that pay it back. is it tempting to spend money and enh
CSPAN
Aug 4, 2013 8:15am EDT
connection. now there's no option for it. >> how america's economic future is being controlled by companies controlling ark excess -- abscess to the internet. >>> jonathan alter reports on the 2012 presidential election and president obama's re-election team unit losed analytics. this event from the commonwealth club of california in san francisco is about an hour and fifteen minutes. you can find us on the internet at commonwealth club.org or download the iphone or android app for program and schedule information and pod cast of past programs. how is that for a lit ration. now it's my pleasure to intro-- introduce our speaker, columnist, and writer. jonathan alter. a writer and a contributor to the bloomberg. author of the new book we'll talk about "the center holds: obama and his enemies." as i he's an analyst and contributing correspondent. you've seen him on nbc and msnbc. he worked for almost thirty years writing more than fifty cover story. me wrote for "the new york times," the wall street, vanity fair, and the new republican. he's the author of other books fkd -- he is a,
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2013 11:00pm EDT
america and you can follow him on twitter or on his plod page at jesse walker died blocks bought -- bond spy now present you jesse walker and his second book united states of paranoia a conspiracy theory. [applause] >> what i am going to do is read about the book then there will be a shooting then i will read a little bit more from the book then we will take your questions. on january 30th and 803580 jackson the assassin drew a weapon and pointed at the president the pistol misfired people the second weapon loaded it and it failed to fire several bystanders subdued the would-be killer and richards warns that later informed interrogators you become richer the third in that with jackson dead money would be more plenty that he was committed to a asylum where he died three decades later. that was the official story. to witnesses filed affidavits that they saw him at the home of george poindexter before the attack. he was a noisy opponent to the jackson administration and accused the senator to plot the president's murder then he quickly could mean the investigation. jackson told byst
CSPAN
Aug 6, 2013 8:00pm EDT
made in black america? i'm going to ask you to comment on what you see as the impact of these three events in the political culture and what they say about what kind of progress is and what is not being made in the 21st century. >> that's a very provocative question. it's difficult to come up with quick answers in the heat of this particular moment. we tried to address it. but those three legal interventions so to speak tell us what racial progress has meant historic way, progress in an area of race equality is always to recognized by the movement forward and the retrenchment so that there is never any street sense of progress. we certainly have made great strides in the 1963 march on washington. there was the voting rights act to years later and what 50 years later we have a retrenchment on the key piece of legislation. we have something that none of us know to be an act of racial violence where the person has been found not guilty to the they are calling it an act of racial violence and that shows you the way the retrenchment works and it is a more sophisticated and more difficult
CSPAN
Aug 5, 2013 8:30pm EDT
and also we have been the beneficiary of america is ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you are not sure you agree with these propositions of want to ask you to prepare their relative position of the united states and the islamic republic of vibration in the mideast today with where they were even with 9/11 just over 10 years ago. on the eve of 9/11, every single government in the middle east was every'' one dash pro-american dash egypt and turkey are in negotiations to become pro-american like syria or libya or the taliban government in afghanistan are staying in iraq every single government was either pro-american in negotiations it to become pro-american or anti-iranian that is a good position for the united states in the middle east. but because of elections today governments across the middle east in egypt egypt, tunisia, libya, leban on egypt, tunisia, libya, lebanon,, they're all though longer pro-american or anti-iranian. they are all pursuing a least, at least independent forum policies which are by definition much less enthusiastic about st
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2013 8:00am EDT
it from being the most important institutional space in black america today. whether or not churches are actually neighborhood churches anymore, how many of these institutions have become atm gospel. oh, i didn't say that. >> prosperity -- call it out. >> prosperity folks in a neoliberal moment. how many folks have turned their backs on a kind of prophetic approach or theology? so part of what i'm trying to suggest is it's always been a problematic relationship between religion and democracy. our institution, the black church, has been central because of the history of exclusion of black folk in the united states which has made religious discourse central to giving voice to our political demands. but given the shifts and changes, the church or churches have been decentered. and part of what we have to do is tell ourselves the story about what are the implications of that fact. if it's a fact that you're willing to concede to me. if not, then we can have a debate. i hope that makes sense. did that make sense? [applause] okay. >> well, i'm noted for throwing the pyre bomb in the road -
CSPAN
Aug 19, 2013 7:15am EDT
going to give you this $10. the first thing as, come from america? i said how did you know? he said, well, unfortunately they give us money. they throw money. to a 10 year-old who actually supports seven members of the family, and actually begging to be honest because he did not want to give the money without shine issues. i said do it for me. do it as a gift. do it for your sisters. just take his, so i gave him $20. but the point is, is that people may not be educated but they are not stupid. there's a difference that the world today does not understand. that's why this lady asked me what the people of afghanistan want, because they think they are all criminals. they're not. they are good people. they are innocent. they have been victimized. read the history. they have been victimized for years and years. they have been abandoned. there's a section in my book, deserter. that's exactly what happened but how was it possible for the world to allow a saudi arabian national to go rule of another country? what happened? how is it possible for those outlaws in the middle east and others t
CSPAN
Aug 19, 2013 1:00am EDT
america? >> guest: it is very interesting. ripe for a libertarian group of people to really show them how you doing it and how people's lives can be better because now we see in so many ways that people would not imagine four or five years ago that a terrifyingly force if you stop and think about it, when conspiracy theorist start selling rational you know, it is in trouble. >> host: you have another chapter in here is this about mayor judy collins -- judea -- mayor guiliani. >> guest: into his tenure he tried to bring the video music awards to york city and had been in los angeles. i attended the last three at universal wert mtv was going to take it out a times square and the mayor said we will roll out the red carpet and they took on a challenge for the first year they said we will let some of the vj really be a part of the show and present the awards had we will treat you like stars. it is a new era. by 22nd birthday i was so excited. one of the very first things i did on camera with bill bellamy in the mayor of new york society -- new york city we about go on york tv the biggest award
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2013 7:45pm EDT
america was in 1964, and what happened over the next ten years in vietnam? we were hum led; -- humbled; right? there's the -- there is something, i think, profoundly humbling about what happens to giants, the goliaths, and there could be someone in position of great authority and power is more precarious position than i think most people realize. >> why do goliaths shoot themselves in the foot? >> well, many republicans. i -- well, many reasons. i explore a couple. they assume the strategies that made them great will keep them great, and that's not true. two is they underestimate just how useful a struggle was. how creative it made them. when you don't have a enough, when you're business could shut down tomorrow, when your constantly, at the very end of your wit, you, you know, i mean, some cases you fold and die, but if you don't, you learn how to be innovative and to take chances and to take risks and do all kinds of thing that you are propose propoled to do things you wouldn't ordinarily do. when you are comfortable, you are no longer under that compulsion, and that is a
CSPAN
Aug 25, 2013 4:15pm EDT
of other ethnic groups in america at the time. this thing got some momentum. they started picking the fbi offices. scarpa sr. was like picketing every day. often the spokesman. night he would go back and wrap of colombo to the fbi. and so the first year the fbi thought it was going to blow over. the first to the they had a rally, 50,000 people showed up. it got so big the sinatra give a concert. they actually got so powerful that they got aaron spelling to make the name mafia out of their series the fbi. they got the producer of the godfather to take mafia out of the godfather. there is no mention of the word the mafia in the godfather. that is a powerful they got. joe also got powerful. the other bosses on the commission, including gambino, started to get jealous. at the second rally, i happened to be their working a few blocks away, 50,000 people were there. a young african americans supposedly posing as a camera man fired a shot. he was mortally wounded, but it took years to die. i have evidence in my book that scarpa senior may have had something to do with that. that is too l
CSPAN
Aug 4, 2013 3:00pm EDT
eddie glaude the author of acts exodus raise religion and nation and early 19th century black america and more recently "in a shade of blue" pragmatism and the politics of black america. following eddie the reverend dr. dr. james forbes the author of 2000 hymnbook "who's gospel" a concise guide to progressive protestantism and their final panelist will be this up in conversation in a moment, obery hendricks the author of "the politics of jesus" rediscovering the two true revolutionary of jesus teachings and the universe bends towards justice radical reflections on the bible of the church and body politics. taking a launch off of professor hendricks most recent title with a "that suggest what is the most iconic and popular image of black churches in african-american religion taken them not from none other than dr. martin luther king. a whole host of assumptions from for me think about our title has the church squarely fit in american democracy and black life? reimagined black churches on the front lines marching and we forget in fact dr. king represent a minority movement. i want to in
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2013 8:00am EDT
believed that business in america should serve some point. there should be an and the business. it didn't message you have to have a broad social and that there should be some point to it, which automatically testing wishes and for most of our business folks from today. he had kind of an enlightened sense of what this is journalism could be about. >> he didn't mind criticism of business. >> that's right. let's face it, when it's 1933 and its 1934, it's kind of hard to defend business. he had a henry hoover conception of heroic business, but in the early part of the depression it was almost impossible for any honest person to continue to take that line. so fortune and its writers including agee begin to confront some of the more unseemly side of the country. so fortune ran pieces about -- they ran a piece about the tennessee valley authority, which agee wrote and which luce told him was told there was one of the best things i've ever been printed since fortune had been around. so they were brought and pragmatically open to new deal reforms. and i keep mentioning dwight macdonald bec
CSPAN
Aug 18, 2013 7:30am EDT
america's police forces." in the book it goes through sort of the current state of our police force are which is a bit different. i'll introduce her speakers in a moment but a quick thing about what we'll did today. we will have radically speak first to mark lomax will talk about the issue as well and then we'll have plenty of time for q&a. i also want to note on the cato affiliate website we have a map that goes through what radley will mention today, an ongoing, updated so it's a good resource for anyone who's interested in the topic which i think is all the. let me briefly introduce our speakers. radley balko is a senior writer and investigative reporter for the "huffington post" where he covers civil liberties and the ship and train criminal justice system it is a former senior editor for reason magazine and has worked with the u.s. supreme court. mark lomax is that the director of national tactical officers association. he worked in library west africa as a programming for united nations overseeing liberian national police route emergency response unit. is also serve as the dir
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2013 2:00pm EDT
globe to dinosaur studies in europe, asia, south america, and africa. this gives you an idea of the kinds of illustrations in the book so it is serious stuff. what we are learning here on page 440, this is a family chart of the clades of dinosaurs, and this is an example, obviously, of the detailed charts that are in here. these are dinosaur eggs because there's a chapter on the paleo biology on dinosaurs, and there's an entire section on what dinosaurs eat, and they find out what dinosaurs ate from fossilized feces called copperlites. they go into dinosaur reproduction, which they've been able to figure out, not antedoal, but they figured it out, how dinosaurs grew, dinosaur diseases, actually a science called paleo pathology. they had a lot of arthritis and bone diseases, not surprising considering how big and heavy they were. studying dinosaur tracks, of course, is a way we found out a lot about dinosaurs, and this is -- these are ct scans from a chapter about technology and palentology. this shows, on the right-hand side, how they breathed. dinosaur evolution is involved, and th
CSPAN
Aug 25, 2013 7:45pm EDT
more racial violence in america than there had ever been since reconstruction and worse in many different ways, yet it was also a time when there was great literature being written, great music being composed, the mets won the world series, which for those of a certain age will understand this was about as miraculous as things could get. and then there was the great day that a man first walked on the moon. on that day when that happened at spawn ranch the women of the manson family were doing what they always did every day. charles manson had told the women that there role as dictated by the bible, as dictated by the beatles and dictated by him, they must be subservient to men at all times. and so all of the women in the family every afternoon were required to form a semicircle. mend things because that is what women were supposed to do. and so they're sitting there selling, leslie van houten and patricia kremlin go. the woman who was known as squeaky. sandy good, susan atkins, linda to say behan, names you ever before in other contexts. and one of them says, do you know what? h
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2013 11:00pm EDT
one public high-school in america is one years old the gershwin brothers with there and when they built battery park city and added that to lower manhattan, the quid pro quo was to build a new campus incredible. the olympics sized pool and a broadway stage and orchestra. not a brilliant. 28,000 applicants per year and only about six -- 681 dash 800 students get it and the second day of high school is 9/11 and i was in california. he cannot get from the phone his mother working as it abc news and she jumps on the subway he and cannot get through flip being out to then get on the bus to go back up down and only the do york story they stopped the bus at 34 streak there is a rule that you cannot let people off the bus between stops but they kicked the window out so down she gets on another bus and christopher is on the bus with a bunch of his friends. then they go home. we actually did a little piece that night then i found out of it incredible fire marshal died that day and i met him in 1997 i had written the book that i republished with a new edition. i went to the fire museum is an
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2013 4:45pm EDT
all this happen. we, as a country in america, said, we're leaving now, going to asia as far as focus is concerned, and the bad guys take the territory, and that's what's going on, and that leaves benjamin netanyahu and israel leaving isolated. how do you feel that plays out? >> uh-huh. in terms of arab-israeli or in terms of -- -- >> [inaudible] >> well, we are in a situation with the arab spring where it's a tumultuous time. it takes a generation to play itself out. i think there's going to be convulsions for the next 10-20 years that we have to deal with at some level. up fortunately, with these convulsions, there's not much incentive for peace. there's, you know, i always thought that for an arab israeli peace, that you have to have all of the important players, the leadership, the leaders to be committed to it, you know, israel, the united states, syria, whoever. palestinian leadership. they have to be on the same boat. there's been progress during those time, but, unfortunately, shotgun happens, and one is assassinated, african-american benjamin netanyahu comes to power in 1996,
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2013 4:15pm EDT
city in north america but if you go to winnipeg now what you would see are a lot of splendid ill things which are put up around a fantastic -- built in 1913. very grand, not lots of gold and tremendous to developed scale. once gets a tremendous confidence about the future and indeed winnipeg in 1913 was one of the fastest-growing cities. the idea was the future was very much winnipeg's to take. if you go there now you wouldn't get the same feeling. in fact you might say 1913 was the highpoint. but i think it's important to remind oneself of periods of time in the past when expectations of the future in this case an expectation that winnipeg would be the great capital of the prairies, people are very confident about these things then they turn out to be somewhat misplaced. for india, is there really one india or another? perhaps there are hundreds of india's. i choose to look at bombay in that year. india of course is part of the british empire the lynchpin of the british empire tremendously important economically, tremendously important politically. really india is to a large deg
CSPAN
Aug 19, 2013 1:20am EDT
states because this will be a shock to most of your listeners but the progression of america, i don't even call it american it anymore is just another country we are undistinguished we used to be special indifferent and everybody knew it now is just another loaded government running another geographical area. it is turning into a police state very rapidly with the militarization of the police they don't knock on the door anymore it is just a s.w.a.t. brayed the government is completely and totally bankrupt 1.2 trillion dollars 90 percent was purchased by the federal reserve even the tidies to not want to buy it a try to get rid of their dollars. there is a panic for the exit. >> host: we invited you to talk about the book that has just come out, "totally incorrect" has told to lewis and james. who is he? >> guest: he writes the newsletter for us called the international speculator that follows exploration companies, apollo style section anywhere. >> host: what is a junior resources company? >> guest: looking for gold, nickel, uranium, kobol ds, you name it. 92 naturally occurrin
CSPAN
Aug 25, 2013 7:00pm EDT
the mediterranean as opposed to lead germany and russia. and you have lots above and america. but my mother's family the from the ukraine, from russia. always been fascinated by russia for that reason. as the origin of my obsession with russia, the soviets have premise of. >> host: young stalin, what can we learn about the future dictator stalin from his use? >> guest: everything. it was such fun. trusty said that young stalin missed the revolution. in fact, this book is like butch cassidy and the sundance kid combined with the russian revolution. he was a specialist in assassination and in bank robberies. in his 1907 bank robbery made the headlines all over the world he held up a stagecoach. it was like that puts cassidy antithesis. the killed enormous numbers of people. they got away with the equivalent of like $20 million. lenin's bolshevik party. the interesting thing is no one has been able to prove that stalin actually organized this bank robbery. he actually kill the people who could prove it. when he became a world statesman he did not want to seem like a bank robber. so he b
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2013 8:45pm EDT
warrior cop" the militarization of america's police forces. in the book it goes through sort of the current state of where police forces or which is a little bit different than it used to be and what people realize they are. i want to do so speakers in a moment that a quick thing about what we are going to do today. we are going to have bradley. >> first and mark lomax will talk about the issue and plenty of time for q&a with you all. they also want to note on the cato affiliated web site police misconduct.net we have a rainman -- map that goes through the instances in the details of the story in an ongoing resource for anyone interested in this topic which i think it's all of you. let me briefly introduce her speakers and we will get started. radley balko is the investigator reported for the helping "huffington post" helping of postbreakup or civil liberties in the criminal justice system and he is a former senior editor for reason magazine and his work has been cited by the supreme court. his writing is cited as an excerpt of the mississippi seizing supreme court and has had a dir
CSPAN
Aug 18, 2013 1:45pm EDT
my only comment about that. so this has been on public television across america several times. wrensen -- norway, israel, south korea, romania. believe it's a shot in estonia which is interesting. so chris is happy to have had a success with this. again, is not about a single teacher. when i see his film i see myself, but in literally disappears. as see myself teaching, but i see my teachers teaching to me, my mother's -- mother was my fourth grade teacher in virginia and now i turned out really well. everything came out and we became as one. my mother's gesture there. my smile, my tenth grade geometry teacher. the way she puts her hand on the desk whenever i get over to the desk which is hardly ever. all those experiences have gone into making, of course, every effort i can manage to be the teacher. so i held a huge -- a huge debt of gratitude to all those teachers. we all do really. we all have a lineage. we'll come to summer. someone made it possible for us to be in to be here. without them we would not a survived. from the very first day we l.a. huge unpayable debt to so m
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2013 5:00pm EDT
signed, over 30,000 british troops in north america, but they just decided to leave. washington learns this lesson in the summer of 1776 or the thought process that leads to the learning lesson begins at that time. it's hard for him to accept this, but, eventually, he does. if you think about it, many of the great generals in world history are losers. hanibal, napolean, robert e. lee, rommel, washington was not a good general. he lost more battles than he won, but he was a winner. he was a because of the resilience and strategics he had at the inside level. i think my time is kind of up. i'll end with a somewhat controversial question or statement. when the war in iraq was wrash eting up, i got a call from the woman who does op-eds at the l.a. times and said shsh -- she said, i want you to write an op-ed on what washington would have done about iraq. [laughter] or what he would do. i said, stephanie, washington wouldn't know where iraq was. [laughter] he wouldn't know about weapons of mass destruction, jihad, whatever. she said, that's right; now right the piece. [laughter] i wrote thi
CSPAN
Aug 25, 2013 7:45am EDT
our booktv archive. >> next, from the annual publishing industry tradeshow, book expo america. a panel discussion on the future of the publishing industry. it's 45 minutes. >> hello everybody. i'm the director for the center for publishing at new york university and thanks so much for coming to our panel discussion, "rising industry insiders: what those new to the publishing industry think about its future." i'm sure those of you have been attending other conferences have been listening to what some of the very senior publishing executives have to say about their vision of the publishing industry going forward. but this afternoon you hear something a little different. you're going to get the viewpoint of those were new to the industry. we have free of our current welcome one just graduated, but three of our best in science punishing students here today and one alumnus and they will present their thoughts on what all of you in the industry in general should be doing fresh, relevant and innovative in these challenging times. we come to the separation, all of them are working in the publi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 150